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arbieroo

Arbie's Unoriginally Titled Book Blog

It's a blog! Mainly of book reviews.

Currently reading

The Medusa Chronicles
Alastair Reynolds, Stephen Baxter
Progress: 20/336 pages
Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth
John Garth
Progress: 190/398 pages
Hainish Novels & Stories, Vol. 2
Ursula K. Le Guin
Progress: 133/789 pages
The Essential Shakespeare
Ted Hughes
Progress: 75/259 pages
Introduction to Topology
Bert Mendelson
Progress: 10/224 pages
Bruegel: Defining a Destiny
Amy Orrock, Jennifer Scott
Progress: 79/128 pages
Basics of Plasma Astrophysics
Claudio Chiuderi, Marco Velli
Progress: 58/250 pages
A Student's Guide to Lagrangians and Hamiltonians
Patrick Hamill
Progress: 7/180 pages
The Complete Plays and Poems
E.D. Pendry, J.C. Maxwell, Christopher Marlowe
Gravitation (Physics Series)
Kip Thorne;Kip S. Thorne;Charles W. Misner;John Archibald Wheeler;John Wheeler
Progress: 48/1215 pages

Stubbs and the Wild, Amina Wright

Stubbs and the Wild - Amina Wright

Stubbs' reputation as "the painter of horses" is both deserved and unfair. Deserved because he was the best painter of horses there'd ever been, without a doubt, surely because of his meticulous anatomical work on the same. Unfair because he did not limit himself to horses and portrayed numerous species, some of them very exotic, with the same skill, accuracy and flair, in active poses and repose alike and in magnificent landscape settings or not. He also used several media besides oils, including various types of prints and pioneering work with enamels on ceramic supports.

 

The book itself is a short, informative introduction to George Stubbs' work, with illustrations that demonstrate Stubbs' range of subject and technique clearly.

Reading progress update: I've read 114 out of 398 pages.

Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth - John Garth

I got bogged down as soon as he started talking about Tolkien's mythos. I got enough of that from Christopher Tolkien.

Reading progress update: I've read 22 out of 128 pages.

Poetry in the Making: A Handbook for Writing and Teaching - Ted Hughes

Fascination with animals from early childhood. Good words to use in poetry are verbs and words associated with a particular sense e.g. smell. Imagine as accurately as possible the thing you want to write about and just write down whatever words come to mind to describe it. Poem as living thing.

Reading progress update: I've read 14 out of 52 pages.

Stubbs and the Wild - Amina Wright

Anatomical drawings of horses that look like they could be the basis of monsters in a horror/fantasy movie.

Reading progress update: I've read 14 out of 128 pages.

Poetry in the Making: A Handbook for Writing and Teaching - Ted Hughes

Based on a series of radio broadcasts, aimed at 10-14 year olds and their teachers.

Reading progress update: I've read 103 out of 398 pages.

Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth - John Garth

Possibly controvercial opinion: Tolkien was a better poet than prose stylist.

Reading progress update: I've read 186 out of 818 pages.

The Complete Stories of Robert Louis Stevenson: Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Nineteen Other Tales (Modern Library Classics) - Barry Menikoff, Robert Louis Stevenson

The Pavillion on the Links:

Still part of the New Arabian Nights, this is one of those "How I met my wife" adventure stories, more interesting during the mysterious first part than the beleagured on all sides second part. Fun enough, very Stevenson.

Reading progress update: I've read 370 out of 1327 pages.

The Riverside Chaucer - Geoffrey Chaucer

Various supplicants beg Fame for good, bad or no reputation, sometimes the truth, sometimes lies.

Hist Whist, E.E. Cummings

Hist Whist - E.E. Cummings

Most of these don't seem to be particularly aimed at children in the same way that Cummings' Fairy Tales obviously are. On the other hand there's a high proportion of really good poems here. A high  proportion of only 20 in this slender volume, which appears to contain 4 poems not in Collected Poems. That justified the purchase to me, with my completist tendencies towards writers I greatly admire.

Gemaldegalerie Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin: Director's Choice, Michael Eissenhauer

Director's Choice Gemaldegalerie Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin - Michael Eissenhauer

A neat, affordable souvenier book for the museum. Eissenhauer must have had an awful time trying to cut ~3,000 works down to just 37! I didn't see all of this museum when I was there and I'm glad of some of the reproductions of works I didn't have time for.

Reading progress update: I've read 78 out of 80 pages.

Director's Choice Gemaldegalerie Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin - Michael Eissenhauer

Shout out to Anna Dorothea Therbusch who has a Self Portrait, 1782, hanging in this museum! Moves the earliest major female artist I've come across back by about 90 years! The picture is unfinished but the completed sections are eggzellent quality.

Collected Poems for Children, Ted Hughes

Collected Poems For Children - Ted Hughes

Ranging from the deliberately daft (e.g. Meet my Folks, the Moon poems) to the serious but accessible (e.g. Season Songs), this collection brings together all the poetry for children Hughes wrote in one place. Nevermind the kids - read it yourself and see Hughes' more light-hearted and comedic side.

Reading progress update: I've read 5 out of 27 pages.

Hist Whist - E.E. Cummings

If I have deduced correctly, 4 poems in here do NOT appear in Collected Poems.

Reading progress update: I've read 60 out of 80 pages.

Director's Choice Gemaldegalerie Staatliche Museen Zu Berlin - Michael Eissenhauer

The book mimics the organisation of the gallery. As you enter you are at the 1400s. Moving forward you progress to the 1700s. On the left are paintings from North of the Alps. On the right, paintings from South of the Alps. The book starts on the left, goes up to the far end, then comes back and does the same on the right.

Reading progress update: I've read 67 out of 398 pages.

Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth - John Garth

I've learned more about how philology actually works from this book than in the rest of my life. Consequently I also understand the connection between Tolkien's "legends" and the evolution of his languages better than at any point previously.

Reading progress update: I've read 18 out of 398 pages.

Tolkien and the Great War: The Threshold of Middle-earth - John Garth

Tolkien started inventing languages, aged 10, the same year he started reading Chaucer...