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arbieroo

Arbie's Unoriginally Titled Book Blog

It's a blog! Mainly of book reviews.

Currently reading

Nonlinear Time Series Analysis
Thomas Schreiber, Holger Kantz
Progress: 29/320 pages
The Politics of Neurodiversity: Why Public Policy Matters
Dana Lee Baker
Progress: 9/239 pages
Ursula K. Le Guin: Hainish Novels and Stories, Vol. 1: Rocannon's World / Planet of Exile / City of Illusions / The Left Hand of Darkness / The Dispossessed / Stories (The Library of America)
Brian Attebery, Ursula K. Le Guin
Progress: 440/1100 pages
Life and Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume 1: By Charles Darwin - Illustrated
Charles Darwin
Progress: 332/346 pages
Basics of Plasma Astrophysics
Claudio Chiuderi, Marco Velli
Progress: 58/250 pages
Ursula K. Le Guin: The Complete Orsinia: Malafrena / Stories and Songs (The Library of America)
Brian Attebery, Ursula K. Le Guin
Progress: 359/700 pages
A Student's Guide to Lagrangians and Hamiltonians
Patrick Hamill
Progress: 7/180 pages
Complete Poems, 1904-1962
E.E. Cummings
Progress: 110/1102 pages
The Complete Plays and Poems
E.D. Pendry, J.C. Maxwell, Christopher Marlowe
She Stoops to Conquer and Other Comedies (Oxford World's Classics)
Henry Fielding, David Garrick, Oliver Goldsmith
Progress: 76/448 pages
The Wild Girls - Ursula K. Le Guin An eclectic mixture of things has been poured into this slender volume: the longest piece is a short story, there are some poems, an essay, an interview...

The title piece is the short story, a tale of violence and slavery that is both moving and tragic. LeGuin has discussed slavery in her fiction a number of times but this isn't repetition. Here it seems to be used as an extreme case of what happens when a Patriarchal society reduces women to menials and sex-objects. The only flaw I found in this story is that I found it difficult to see how the society portrayed actually arose; it seems oddly artificial to me, which is rare in my experience of LeGuin.

The poems felt competent but it is too small a sample from which to make a proper judgement of the author's stature in that field and they are the only ones I've read. I'm at least not put off reading more.

The essay and interview are outspoken though not terribly surprising in the views espoused.

I would think this volume would appeal most to LeGuin fans who have are already familiar with several of her major fictional works.